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Nature, Nurturing and Natural Women Taking Credit and Owning It.


This post was inspired after being asked, “why do mother’s take credit for raising the children,” and in part after reading ‘Listen to the Squawking Chicken’ by Elaine Lui. (Thoughts on the memoir here).

There are many distinctive female aspects to acclaim. Personally, I like the feminine side of women. Being physically softer; having less facial, chest and or back hair to contend with is a happy plus. I also like painting my nails different colors and spending hours styling my hair. The curves are another bonus, and what girl doesn’t enjoy a healthy wardrobe selection? Skirts, dresses, heels, scarves and the likes make shopping exciting.

Largely however, what I love most about women is the distinctive and prevailing strength that not only blesses them with the ability to be vessels of life, but be a major reckoning force being that vessel of life.

While not the absolute rule, generally the natural role of women and men raising offspring reminds me of how I recall watching lions and lioness behaving in their natural habitats. Lioness nurse and nurture their cubs, and prepare them to survive on their own. Male lions roam.

As such, and go on and slap me with the wet noodle for coming off so old-school, but I believe nurturing children is most effective when attended to within the first five years of a child’s life...by the mother. This distinction albeit, steals none of the father’s thunder. For instance, in the same way the judge on Paternity Court TV thought it endearing when a young man first confided in his father when he got a girl pregnant, I thought it endearing as well because it’s generally not the norm. Nine out of ten times children confide in the nurturer, before a roaming provider.

Now, some may think, ‘oh yeah, sure children go to the nurturer because nurturers are more understanding, lenient, or otherwise prone to coddling,' when what I’m actually inferring is the distinctive influence nurturers have over steering young people to be the world we want to see. That.is.power. A distinctive attribute I like the idea of owning.

#WOMENSMONTH #AmWriting #AmRevising #AmEditing #writinglife #JustBlogged #ReadAnotherGreatMemoir #MyBestFlaw #DontEverGiveUp

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